Satan’s Greatest Feat

Because I’m always up for prodding bumbling religious banalities, I offer up the following scenario.

Suppose that both God and Satan exist. Further, suppose that the Jewish messianic prophecies of the Old Testament are true. Now suppose that you are Satan, the Lord of Lies, a deceitful, powerful, sweet-talking, and maniacal interloper. Suppose that your primary objective is to direct human beings away from worshiping God and to thwart the messianic prophecy if you can. How would you do it?

If it were me, I’d get the mortals to worship some false god with such a passion, with such a blind and unheeding faith, that even if the true messiah were to arrive, he’d be quashed and mocked and forgotten.

Human beings, being corrupt and sinful, naturally fall prey to my deviant and circumspect whisperings. They start to believe that a particular man is blessed by god. He turns their water into wine. He heals their superficial wounds. He raises their dead. He raises himself from the dead. Oh, how easy it was to convince them of his deity! All you must do is appeal to their fear of death, get them to think that if they worship this man who calls himself a god, as a god, that he will cure their fatality, allow them to live forever and ever. Silly, selfish fools, all of them. And now they think that a man, a man who was born out of a woman’s vagina, a man who is composed of cells and hair and sweat, a man who eats and defecates and slobbers, a man who gets tired and aroused and angry, a man who stumbles over cracks in the street.. they think this man is a God.

Annnnnd, scene.

So what’s the point of all this? Ah, it’s pretty simple. Just look how ridiculously easy it was to construct a mythology which completely contradicts a popular religious account of the world. I even used some of their own premises and assumptions. So I pose this question to Christians, to whom this scenario was obviously aimed: How do you know that my account isn’t the truth? How do you know that the god you worship isn’t a malevolent one, that he didn’t manipulate your ancestors into believing in him, that he didn’t manipulate those fables which make up the core of your world view into existence? Is it not feasible?

I look forward to your responses.

Advertisements

4 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Nedbanks Nemesis on October 12, 2007 at 8:47 am

    Have you heard the theory explaining “Why Evil Exists”.

    Some PhD candidate has observed that the most successful computer games all contain significant themes of evil. The trouble is that the non-evil games just are not too much fun to play.

    Ergo : Evil exists because we are just one big computer game for higher beings.

    Reply

  2. Posted by Nedbanks Nemesis on October 12, 2007 at 8:50 am

    Make that a PhD candidate at Oxford University (The Oxford, in case any other’s exist) – there may be a few cuckoo types in Cambridge, but those from Oxford tend to be a bit more feet-on-the-ground types (well CS Lewis was, not that sure about JRR Tolkien)

    And a BTW, I have a quote that poses the counterpoint about the meaning of life and how this arises due to mankinds existence :

    Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence – Aristotle.

    Reply

  3. Interesting that Jews and Christians think that they are based on the same faith and have the same ideas about the afterlife. Nothing could be further from the truth.

    Christian: “You must accept our god avatar as your saviour otherwise you will go to hell.”

    Jew: “That’s okay, there is no hell. The worst punishment I can get is nine months in pergatory before I’m admitted to heaven.”

    Christian: “Well, you are thinking that way because satan wants you to think that there is no hell.”

    Jew: “Satan? Who’s that?”

    So who’s right? From within their own world there is no way to understand the other’s world because there are no similar paradigms. Everyone has the “right” idea of god. Strange that.

    Reply

  4. > How would you do it?
    I’ve often wondered why lucifeR continues with his ultimately doomed war. He knows where he has come from, he knows who he is dealing with, and he knows where he is going. If I were him I would just roll over and breathe my last.
    I must go re-read the last chapter in CS Lewis’s “Screwtape Letters” again, see how he concluded the matter.

    > So what’s the point of all this?
    That being – playing the deviL’s advocate.

    You become what you pretend to be, so take care with pretence.
    (Being an advocate may turn out to be as dangerous as being the devil himself).

    > How do you know that my account isn’t the truth?
    >> Because I’m always up for prodding bumbling religious banalities
    Maybe that’s a universal litmus test for “false truths”.

    > How do you know that the god you worship isn’t a malevolent one, that he didn’t manipulate your ancestors into believing in him, that he didn’t manipulate those fables which make up the core of your world view into existence?

    For all the “professed words of faith” in the world, what one, or all men, believe does not change the truth, or reality, of the situation. Of course it does not help elicit the truth either.
    The answer may well be just as has been stated,
    “It is not in knowing, but in believing”

    Of course, choosing not to believe in the existence of God or sataN does not reduce the probability of its dire consequences either, one simply remains in ignorance of this probability until “Game Over”.

    > Is it not feasible?
    Well it’s just one half baked religion in a world population of 7 billion.
    Feasible? Yes. Of any significance? No!

    You’ll probably think I am gunning for you a bit (is it Markus? Or I have got confused with another blogger today?)
    Not at all, I always have time to read the well written blogs of qualified people – and it is more interesting to have an adversarial game, rather than trying to play chess with both holding the white pieces 🙂

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: